Faculty & Staff

Graham W. Redgrave, MD

Director for Residency Education

 

Dr. Redgrave received his B.A. from St. John's College and his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He completed an internship in general internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and psychiatric residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he served as chief resident. Dr. Redgrave is an attending psychiatrist with clinical expertise in eating disorders. His research focuses on neuroimaging of anorexia using MRI techniques, eating disorder treatment outcomes; he is also developing with basic science collaborators in our department techniques to use imaging to study animal models of eating disorders. 

 

Dr. Redgrave was faculty member in the Colleges Advisory Program, where he mentored medical students and taught clinical skills from 2009-2013. He was Associate Director for Residency Education from 2012-2013 and has been Director for Residency Education from 2013.

Anne E. Ruble, MD, MPH

Associate Director for Residency Education

 

Dr. Anne Ruble is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Ruble earned her medical and M.P.H. degrees at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. She completed both a residency – serving as chief resident for one year – and a fellowship in psychiatry at Johns Hopkins. She joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 2013. Her research interests include affective (mood) disorders and depression in adolescents.

John R. Lipsey, MD

Assistant Director for Residency Education

 

Dr. Lipsey received his B.A. from the Johns Hopkins University and his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He completed his internship in internal medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center and returned to Johns Hopkins for his psychiatric residency, where he was chief resident. Following his fellowship training, Dr. Lipsey joined the full-time faculty at Hopkins in 1982. His clinical expertise is in the treatment of affective disorders with particular interest in the treatment of geriatric and medically complex patients. His research has focused on post-stroke mood disorders.

Durga Roy, MD, MS

Director for Residency Education, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center

 

Dr. Roy is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and is based at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, where she is the Assistant Director for Residency Education and an attending psychiatrist. She received her MD from the University of New Mexico in 2008 and completed a psychiatry residency at  Long Island Jewish Medical Center in 2012 and a psychosomatics fellowship at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in 2013. She is currently the Director of the psychosomatics fellowship.

 

Karen L. Swartz, MD

Director for Residency Mentorship

 

Dr. Swartz is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and serves as Director of Clinical Programs at the Johns Hopkins Mood Disorders Center. She is also Co-Director of the Women’s Mood Disorders Clinic, founder of the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program, and an attending psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins with extensive clinical experience in mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and eating disorders. For ten years, Dr. Swartz was the Associate Director for Residency Education in the Department.

Chris Ross, MD, PhD

Director for Residency Research Education

 

In their study of neuropsychiatric disorders, Dr. Ross and his research team have focused on Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease, and now are using insights from these disorders to approach more complex diseases such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.  They use biophysical and biochemical techniques, cell models, and transgenic mouse models to understand disease processes, and to provide targets for development of rational therapeutics.  These then can provide a basis for developing small molecule interventions, which can be used both as probes to study biology, and if they have favorable drug-like properties, for potential therapeutic development.  We have used two strategies for identifying lead compounds.  The first is the traditional path of identification of specific molecular targets, such as enzymes like the LRRK2 kinase of Parkinson’s disease.  Once structure is known, computational approaches or fragment based lead discovery, in collaboration, can be used.  The second is to conduct phenotypic screens using cell models, or in a collaboration, natural products in a yeast model.  Once a lead compound is identified, we use cell models for initial tests of compounds, then generate analogs, and take compounds that look promising to preclinical therapeutic studies in animal models.  The ultimate goal is to develop therapeutic strategies that can be brought to human clinical trials, and we have pioneered in developing biomarkers and genetic testing for developing strategies.

Kellie L. Tamashiro, PhD

Co-Director for Residency Research Education & Assistant Director for Residency Mentorship

 

Dr. Tamashiro is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She has mentored graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and medical students. Her research interests include the effects of maternal stress on diet, activity-based anorexia (a rodent model of anorexia nervosa), and basic mechanisms underlying these behavioral phenotypes.

Margaret S. Chisolm, MD

Vice Chair of Education

 

Dr. Chisolm is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Director of Education at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, and Associate Director of the Paul R. McHugh Program for Human Flourishing. Dr. Chisolm received her BA from UMBC and her MD from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She completed a psychiatry internship at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where she served as chief resident. Dr. Chisolm is board-certified in addiction medicine and her scientific research has focused on perinatal substance use, particularly cigarette smoking in pregnancy. However, Dr. Chisolm is also an active educational scholar with expertise is in social media in medicine and has mentored many trainees on a wide array of scholarly projects. In addition, Dr. Chisolm is an Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism Scholar, an invited member of the Miller-Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence and the American College of Psychiatrists, and the recipient of the 2014 Johns Hopkins University Alumni Association Excellence in Teaching Award.

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